Digital Photography | Basics and Software Guides

Digital Photography - How Many Mega pixels Do We Need?

Are you having megapixel envy each time you walk by the camera section of your favorite electronics store? So do I. But, do we really need more and more pixels? The answer depends on what we intend to do with the images. First, a quick definition of megapixel:

Megapixel is a fancy term for “million pixels”. A single pixel is the smallest unit of color that a camera’s sensor is able to capture. The more pixels the sensor can capture the sharper the image the camera can replicate. When comparing cameras, mega pixels can be abbreviated as “MP”.

So how exactly do we know how many pixels we need from our camera? The first step is to have in mind what your intent is for your images. This is important when the purpose for the images require a high resolution digital photo. Photos for only the computer screen need only a low resolution image, making any camera adequate if that is your only need from your photos. High resolution photos are most frequently needed for printing or developing pictures. Using this example, lets use the goal of printing photos to address our question about mega pixels.

The second task is to determine the largest print size we would like of our photo. Sure, it would look cool to have poster-size images all over the house of our sweetheart, but are we really going to go through that expense? I assume for most of us, poster size prints fall into the “rarely or never” category. Having ruled out extreme sizes, we have the three most common photo sizes to consider. According to online photo labs, the following minimum resolutions are sufficient to produce high quality prints:

4 x 6″: 640 x 480 pixels (0.3 megapixels) 5 x 7″: 1024 x 768 pixels (0.8 megapixels) 8 x 10″: 1536 x 1024 pixels (1.6 megapixels)

I know from personal experience that my 3 megapixel camera is as low as I want to go for an 8 x 10″ print; any less would start showing pixilation at close examination. Based on this experience, I suggest doubling the above megapixel recommendations when buying a camera. This exercise has taught us that if we only want 4 x 6″ prints, then 0.6 megapixels are sufficient. Most digital cameras start at 2 megapixels, which is sufficient to produce quality prints up to 5 x 7″.

Now that we know the minimum megapixel requirements for our needs, we are free to focus on other important features of the camera such as lens quality, color reproduction, optical zoom, body size, etc.

How To Assess Like A Pro The Best Digital Photography Software!

Digital photography has revolutionised the way we take photographs. In particular the fact that we can now easily digitally edit photographs from the comfort of our own homes on our PCs. Digital photography software is now at the reach of all amateur photographers, not just the professionals like it once was.

Since digital photography has become mainstream, the number of digital photography editing software programmes from different software manufacturers on the market has become very numerous, catering for all the different needs and wants of society. For this reason deciding which digital photography software to purchase can be a hard decision.

With so many different photography software programs available, you will need to determine what features are important to you and what features are not so important. Quite a lot of the amateurs out there are quite happy to have simple basic and functional software where as the more professional or advanced photographers want more advanced controls for their editing.

One kind of photography editing software available focuses on providing tools specifically created with the artistically minded photographers in mind. These software programmes are generally not sophisticated enough for most professionals, but there tools can prove very useful to a lot of the more artistically minded amateur photographers out there.

A look at the more basic photography software

The way things stand right now, basic photography software is the most used in our world today. Generally in these programmes you will have the ability to perform basic edits to your digital photographs like resizing, cropping, redeye removal plus a few printing options and other basic editing tools.

Additionally these basic programmes will also quite often include options to add filters to your photographs and the ability to make your photographs black-and-white etc.

The key difference about these options in basic digital photography software as opposed to these options in professional digital photography software, is that in the basic photography software these options will give you limited control and will be more automated, making it easier for you, but at the same time limiting what you can do with the software.

If you just want to get started with some really basic editing software, by doing a Google search for something like “free digital photography software” you will find there are a number of free applications available. If you are just starting out, these programmes may well be perfect for you, but if you have any editing experience you are more than likely to find these applications too basic.

Once you have been using some basic photography software for some time, you will probably begin to get fed up with it’s basic functionality. What you want to do now is take note of what editing tools you wish to have more control over and what editing tools you wish to have that you don’t presently.

You can then go on the World Wide Web and research different photograph editing software and compare each package to see which is best suited to your everyday needs.

Remember that with the more complex and complete software packages you may have to put some time aside to learn how to use them and you will also have to pay a lot more for them.

Digital Photography Software - Which Is Best For You?

Digital photography has revolutionised the way we take photographs. In particular the fact that we can now easily digitally edit photographs from the comfort of our own homes on our PCs. Digital photography software is now at the reach of all amateur photographers, not just the professionals like it once was.

Since digital photography has become mainstream, the number of digital photography editing software programmes from different software manufacturers on the market has become very numerous, catering for all the different needs and wants of society. For this reason deciding which digital photography software to purchase can be a hard decision.

With so many different photography software programs available, you will need to determine what features are important to you and what features are not so important. Quite a lot of the amateurs out there are quite happy to have simple basic and functional software where as the more professional or advanced photographers want more advanced controls for their editing.

If you are an amateur photographer who has a keen eye for artistic photography and editing, you may want to purchase a digital photography editing software package with your artistic eye in mind. Digital photography software with tools specifically for the more artistically minded photographers out there do exist, although this software may not be sophisticated enough for some of the pros.

A look at the more basic photography software

Most people buy digital photography editing software of a more basic nature. It is common for these basic programmes to include options such as redeye removal, resizing and cropping options, your general printing options and some other photo editing effects.

Additionally these basic programmes will also quite often include options to add filters to your photographs and the ability to make your photographs black-and-white etc.

The main difference between a user using basic photography software and a user using professional editing software, is that the user using the basic software will have a lot less control over the editing process, where as the user using the professional software will have full control over the editing process.

It might surprise you to know that there does exist some very basic totally free editing software out there you can download from the Internet. Like I said this software is generally very basic, but nevertheless it can get you started.

If on the other hand you have already been using some basic photography software for some time now, and are starting to get a bit fed up with the very basic functionality of your software, you need to make a point of taking note of what features you need more control over and what features you would like to have that you currently don’t.

Once you’ve done this, you will be able to search on the net for the photography editing software that fits your needs and wants. Also don’t forget you can check offline photography magazines and other sources for reviews etc.

Remember that with the more complex and complete software packages you may have to put some time aside to learn how to use them and you will also have to pay a lot more for them.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *